ARTIST'S STATEMENT


I inherited a love of oil painting from my father, and early on, discovered the magic of producing an image with oil paints of a scottish stream that appeared be flowing in brilliant colour across and through a tumble of grey rocks. My time spent learning the art of porcelain painting at Worcester increased my appreciation of surface and luminescence of colour. Youthful summers spent sailing, racing and navigating as an RYA Yachtmaster in the the English Channel and my family background on the Isle of Wight, explain  my understanding and the emotional attachment and respect I have for the sea, which has finally drawn me to the Dorset coast, and which I have just started to discover.

 I consider myself lucky to have studied, as a mature student, at 'The Slade' University College London, where I received excellent tuition and  much encouragement, also the pleasure of selling a substantial painting at the final exhibition.  Since then my painting career has benefitted from the support and constructive criticism of many art lecturer friends and course tutors, in particular at Barboune College of Art and Design, Worcester, Great Malvern College of Art and courses arranged by Emily Ball at the Seawhite Studios.

 I have exhibited widely, including  at The Mall Galleries (Royal Institute of Oil Painters - selected in Open Exhibition) and the Slade Gallery, University College London. I am a full member of the Bournemouth Art Club and support Dorset Visual Arts and Dorset Art Weeks. 

There are two parts to my process.  I take my easel into the landscape or onto a beach, drawing. researching and painting, mainly to understand the topography, and remember the colours of a special place. I enjoy both the exploration and the plein air paintings which result. 

In my studio I first consider composition and design using aesthetic traditions, often with many thumbnail sketches.   I then attempt to convey what my senses gathered at the particular place and time.  I want the painting to be free enough to incorporate the rhythms I have seen and felt as every area has its own.  The colours I feed through my memory.   Finally, there may be a process of simplification.  A painting is finished when I feel that it has all come together, is a totality, and every part answers each other - and that is a very difficult thing to explain!

I think of each of my paintings as an object in itself , the end result of my vision of a moment in place and time. When a painting is finished and for sale I hope that the buyer derives many years of pleasure from it, and am always happy to keep in contact. 

Pearl Gatehouse





Bookmark

             

Share this